Posts Tagged ‘parenting’

PostHeaderIcon Screen Addiction

Screen Addiction: What Parents are Saying

Last month I asked parents to write to me about what was topmost on their minds regarding raising their children.  Almost overwhelmingly, screen addiction was the topic. 

One mom wrote and expressed her concern about her teen daughter.  Here’s her note to me, and my response:

Hi Tina,

Phone/screen addiction is on my mind.

My 16-year-old daughter has been wrestling with screen addiction for the past 2-3 years. I’ve taken her phone away and then tried giving it back to her with agreements about following limits and her behavior deteriorates within about 3-4 weeks. Angry outbursts that eventually turn violent, refusal to follow the phone rules, skipping classes at school and grades plummeting. Currently she does not have a phone. And things have gotten much better.

She’d like to get phone privileges back, but I reminded her that we’ve tried reinstating phone privileges on numerous occasions only to have things get way out of control.

For now, I’ve told her that having a phone is not an option for her.

I do let her use my phone to contact her friends, review her gymnastics videos, etc in the evening once chores and homework are done with the understanding that at 9 pm the wifi is unplugged.

This is truly tough to manage. Do you have any helpful insights?


Hi RW,

I do have an insight for you … you’ve been much braver than many parents in setting limits, and I applaud you!  I think the young brain’s susceptibility to addiction to screens will be seen historically as a turning point in our society, and you have done a wonderful thing for your daughter in saying no to giving her brain a “substance” that it cannot handle.  It’s obvious that she cannot function with constant access to a device, so you have taken the adult role and helped her, just as if her brain was addicted to any other “substance.”  I will be using you as a shining example in VERY tough parenting times.

Thank you,


There will be more of these notes from parents coming up!  I learned a lot from asking this question, and I can’t wait to share parents’ comments with you.

If you need help with this or any other parenting issue, click here.

PostHeaderIcon When All You Get is Resistance

When All You Get is Resistance

by Tina Feigal   Copyright © 2017

No, no, no, no, no!  Are you exhausted from fielding way too many acts of resistance from your child? If so, let’s look at how to get rid of such strong resistance, and replace it with calm cooperation. I can almost hear you saying, “She’s obviously never met this kid!”  You’re right, I haven’t met your child, but I do know a thing or two about how resistance develops and what to do about it.

First, when you see repeated resistance, ask yourself, “Why does she respond this way?”  Figuring out why you see this behavior is the first step to resolving it. Pushing harder to make her comply is a step away from resolution.

Second, imagine you were in your child’s shoes, with a young person’s perspective.  You are totally subject to your adults’ decisions, and you are growing up enough to make some of them yourself.  But the adults don’t seem to see that you’re different, so you must resist them until they do.  The message of resistance is, “SEE ME!”

Third, look for ways that you can actively notice the changes in your child’s abilities to make her own decisions.  Maybe she chose away from a toxic friend last week, or maybe she decided to work on her big assignment with friends instead of going it alone.  Maybe she just put her dirty clothes in the hamper without being asked.  Or perhaps she was thoughtful to you in an unexpected way.  These are all the experiences you can use to see her. 

Fourth, let her know. Write a note to your child saying that you notice she’s changing.  Tell her specifically how you see her growing, for example, “I saw you make a great decision about phone time last night. You brought it to the kitchen for charging at 9, as we’d decided, and you allowed yourself some unplugged time. That’s the sign of a truly grown up person, and I’m going to be on the lookout for more signs, as they are coming fast right now! I need to adjust my thinking as to how old you really are, and start treating you in a way that you deserve. ”

Fifth, watch the resistance melt. When you see your child for who she is right now, in the Present Moment, her need to resist you loses its purpose.  Enjoy your victory, share it with your child’s other parent, and write about it in your gratitude journal.

If you would like help with this or any other parenting issue, click here.


PostHeaderIcon Getting Kids to Comply

Getting Kids to Comply

Tina Feigal Copyright © 2015

kids brushingI’ve had the opportunity to listen for parents’ themes the past few weeks, and one that comes up over and over is “How do you get kids to do what you need them to do?”

Here are five tips for helping them to comply, but without having to nag:

1.  Assume kids want to do anything BUT what you’re asking.  This is how they’re wired, to be focused on their own agenda, and not on yours. Once you realize this is normal, you won’t feel so frustrated when they’re only interested in their own things. This is more a brain wiring issue than “being self-centered.” It’s normal for them to be this way.

2. Talk to them with respect.  Don’t shout your commands from another room.  Take the time to go to them and make physical contact if they can tolerate it. A touch on the shoulder or back, just to be sure you’re connecting, is very useful in getting a child’s attention.  This will save a lot of time as you lead them to the task.  Also, touch is very affirming, which is powerful in helping children get out of themselves in order to relate to others’ needs.

3. Bring your children toward you by trusting them.  Say, “I trust you to do your bedtime routine tonight. I’ll meet you in your room in 10 minutes with that book you picked out last night.”

4. Stay focused on them until the task is done.  They have radar for your attention, so keep it honed for the period between when you ask and when the task is complete.  Again, this saves so much time on the back end.

5. Give your heartfelt appreciation for effort and for completion.  “When you respond to my request, I feel so respected and at peace, because you show me that you really are able to work together as a team.  Thank you!”  “When you finish what you’ve started, I feel quite impressed because you’re sticking with it until the very end, which is such a grown-up thing to do!”

Remember, giving your attention to the behaviors you want is the quickest way to grow those behaviors.  It’s also a lot more rewarding for you, which will keep you “in the game.”  Watch minutes get shaved off your normal routines, once cooperation is the norm!

If you would like help with this or any other parenting issue, visit for info on how coaching works.  Isn’t it time you had a peaceful life with your children?