What About When He Gets to the Real World?

Tina Feigal, MS, Ed. © Copyright 2015

Toolbox working manSo often when I offer parents techniques such as speaking in softer tones, not getting upset, listening deeply, and showing respect to a child, they say, “Well that’s not how it will be in the ‘real world.’ What about when he gets a job and his boss tells him what to do, and he’s just supposed to do it?”

Stop. Wait. We left something out of this picture.  It’s called “child development.” The point is that a child is not a “young man,” even though we often call him that.  He’s a developing person, so our expectations need to match his developmental phase, or we will definitely have a fight on our hands. When parents make unreasonable demands of their children, they rebel.  This is not unnatural, as the “organism child” knows what it’s capable of, and it knows what it’s not. This is more of an instinct on the child’s part than a willful decision. In other words, it’s not conscious.

Let’s take a look at expectations.  Would we apply the same argument about the workplace to other areas?  The man in this picture climbs to electrical wires 80 feet above the street to repair them.  So should his parents have started teaching him to shop for clothes, buy tools, drive to work, climb into a cherry picker, and know what to do up there to avoid electrocution when he was 8?  Probably not. But we often get caught in this trap of expectations when it comes to “controlling your behavior” and “showing respect” when we are equally off the mark regarding the child’s capabilities.

Sweet boyHere’s the 8-year-old. He’s not a developed man, as you can see.  He has no facial hair, beard, or pronounced jaw. He has no job, no mortgage, and only a third grade education.  He looks innocent, and he is.  If he crosses his parents, it’s because he doesn’t see the big picture yet, nor does he have the brain development to stop his impulses all the time.  If he’s had trauma, or a diagnosis like ADHD, Asperger’s, autism, or an attachment disorder, he’s a lot younger than 8.  He could use some softer tones, calm demeanor, listening deeply, and yes some respect, until he gets to the point where he needs to answer to a boss.

In fact, all children need those things.  And even adults do.  There’s no hard and fast “world out there” that’s guaranteed to chew your son up if you’ve been gentle with him during childhood.  But if he does encounter such a world, your gentleness has given him time and space to grow, mature, and become the kind of man who can take the inevitable knocks of life with grace and not anger.  The children who can’t respond well to adversity are the ones who were asked to “grow up” too soon.

Having your unique needs met when you’re 2, 8, 16, etc., opens the path to all your educational, social, emotional and worldly maturation.  There’s really no other way to get there.

If you would like help with this or any other parenting issue, visit www.parentingmojo.com/parent-coaching.  Call 651-453-0123 or email tina@parentingmojo.com for an appointment today.

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